Author Topic: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi  (Read 20573 times)

Bhishma Kukreti

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Re: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi
« Reply #90 on: November 29, 2013, 09:45:09 AM »
Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales

(A Research Review on Garhwali-Kumaoni –Haridwar Folk Literature)
                                (Folktales for Managers Series)
                          Management Lessons in Garhwali-Kumaoni Folktales -6
                Management Lessons in Garhwali –Kumaoni Folk Literature part -8

                     Research and Review by: Bhishma Kukreti

                Childbirth is important aspect in animal kingdom. Today, there are medical tips and facilities available for smooth childbirth. However, in past and in various regions in present day too, the women have to take lesions from folk sayings or experienced women for smooth and successful childbirth.
             There a couple of Garhwali folk stories those provide quite a few precautionary lesions for childbirth or parturition.
          The following marvelous folk tale from Ganga Salan Garhwal provides quite few precautions for women in childbirth.

          Garhwali Folktales about Childbirth /Parturition by Kunti and Gandhari

                   The initial part of folk story is taken from Mahabharata epic. Dhritrarashtra was the eldest prince, Pandu was younger prince and Vidur was youngest prince of Kuru dynasty Kingdom Hastinapur. Since, Dhritrirashtra was blind by birth the crown was ascended to Pandu.  However, Pandu had to leave kingdom and had to spend his life in forest due to a sinful act. 
                 For time being Dhritrirashtra was acting as King of Kuru Kingdom. It was decided by nobles that whoever is elder from Dhritrirashtra and Pandu sons would be Kuru Hastinapur King. Gandhari was wife of Dhritrirashtra and Kunti was wife of Pandu.
                  Coincidently, Gandhari and Kunti conceived simultaneously or both became pregnant at the same time.  Gandhari was in Hastinapur city or capital of Hastinapur. Kunti was with Pandu in forest. Both Gandhari and Kunti were eager to deliver child earlier than other.
  On the ninth month of pregnancy of both women, both were eager to deliver child before other. Both Gandhari and Kunti felt parturition pain or first phase of delivery pain at the same time though they were far from each other.
                 As soon as child delivery pain started Kunti went to a Banyan tree. She caught aerial root of Banyan tree and hung her there for time to time for contraction-expansion. In appropriate time, she delivered a male child.
              In Hastinapur, as soon as Gandhari felt first phase of child delivery pain she came out of palace and she started running after goats on the field with speed for contraction and expansion.  She ran after goats for much time. Unfortunately for Gandhari, she got miscarriage. Gandhari delivered a clump of flesh and blood. She kept that blood-flesh clump into a pitcher. Till that time, the news came in Hastinapur that Kunti (wife of Pandu) delivered a male child. Sage Vyas came to Hastinapur and through ritual performance he transformed the flesh-blood mass into hundred sons and a daughter of Gandhari. Eldest was the son and his name was Duryodhan.
           Kunti took right path of child delivery and Gandhari choose wrong path of child delivery and Yudhistar the son of Pandu-Kunti came into this earth earlier than Duryodhan (eldest son from flesh-blood mass) the son of Dhritrirashtra-Gandhari.

 
@@ This story was narrated by Shri Ram Prasad Kukreti, village Mall, Malla Dhangu, , Pauri Garhwal

                       Stages of Childbirth or Parturition

           Latent Phase the First Stage of Childbirth or Parturition
The first phase of childbirth is pain to pregnant woman. This phase is called prodromal labor at which the woman perceives regular uterine contractions. The cervical effacement occurs during the closing week of pregnancy.
 In active phase of first phase, the acceleration of cervical dilation starts.

                  Fetal Expulsion or Second Phase of Childbirth
  The stage starts when the cervix is fully dilated and closes after child delivery. Complete expulsion is called successful child birth.
                Delivery of Placenta or Third Phase of childbirth
 The phase from just after the fetus is expelled until just after the placenta is expelled is said the third phase of childbirth.
  Forth stage starts just after childbirth to six weeks of birth.

               Maternal Mortality is one of biggest problems in India
            According to WHO reports India tops in Maternal Mortality. The maternal mortality is mainly in rural regions.
 Approximately, 80 % of maternal mortality deaths globally occur due to hemorrhage, sepsis, unsafe induced abortion, hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, and obstructed labor. World Health Organization states that these deaths could be avoided by antenatal care, safe delivery care and postnatal care.
  In 2005, in Uttarakhand 61 % urban women went safe child delivery and32% rural women went for safe delivery.  Mass media teaching, education, wealth index are the factors  for women becoming more conscious of taking skillful health assistance.

Copyright @ Bhishma Kukreti bckukreti@gmail.com  28/11/2013

     Notes on   Management Lessons in Garhwali –Kumaoni –Haridwar Folk Literature to be continued….
Management Lessons in Garhwali-Kumaon Folktales, Folk Stories, traditional Narratives, Community stories to be continued …
Research Review of Garhwali-Kumaoni Literature to be continued….
                  References
1-Bhishma Kukreti, 1984, Garhwal Ki Lok Kathayen, Binsar Prakashan, Lodhi Colony, Delhi 110003
2-Anil Dabral, 2007, Garhwali Gadya Parampara,
3- Bhishma Kukreti, 2003, Salan Biten Lok Kathayen, Rant Raibar, Dehradun
4- Bhishma Kukreti, October 2007, Gadhwali Lok kathaon ma Prabandh Shastra ki suchna, Chitthi Patrika (Lok Ktha Visheshank), Dehradun
Xx
Notes on Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Haridwar Garhwal; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Dehradun Garhwal; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Tehri Garhwal; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Uttarkashi Garhwal; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Jaunsar Garhwal; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Chamoli Garhwal; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Rudraprayag Garhwal; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Pauri Garhwal; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Ganga Salan Garhwal Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Garhwal, Uttarakhand ; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Garhwal, Himalaya; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Garhwal, North India; Childbirth or Parturition Management Lessons in Garhwali Folktales from Garhwal, South Asia; 

Bhishma Kukreti

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Re: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi
« Reply #91 on: November 30, 2013, 02:23:04 PM »
                                       Ganv ka Sayana: The Village Chief 

    Garhwali Folktales/Fables/Traditional stories for Managers /executives/boss/supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal part- 7   

                        Folk Tales Collected and edited by: Bhishma Kukreti

      The story is about long back years. There was a village Latu Ganv.
                 Husyaru had six she buffalos. One she buffalo had a kid. One day, the buffalo kid was thirsty and she entered into her master house in search of water. She entered her mouth and head into a ‘Parya’ (a wooden vessel for churning curd). Her head was inside the ‘Parya’ and the buffalo kid was unable to take out her mouth from Parya. Buffalo kid was restless and started throwing her neck here and there to get out from ‘Parya’ but was just unsuccessful to do so. Buffalo kid started running here and there. Husyaru saw the situation that the head of buffalo kid was inside the ‘Parya’. He asked help from other villagers but nobody could get out the head of buffalo kid from “Parya’.
 The villagers advised Husyaru to take help of village chief who was the wisest among all.
          The village chief was called to solve the problem. The village chief came and inspected the situation thoroughly and seriously. He walked around buffalo kid. The village chief ordered to cut the head of buffalo. The head of buffalo kid cut by sword and detached head from body. However, the problem of head being inside ‘Parya’ still existed.
              Now, the village chief ordered to cut the ‘Parya’. Immediately, a person cut wooden ‘Parya by an axe. The head of buffalo kid came out of ‘Parya’. Every villager cheered that the head of buffalo kid had come out. Every villager was astounded for the wise advice of village chief that at last head of buffalo kid came out.
 The villagers started singing and dancing for successful work due to advice by the village chief.


 Copyright @ Bhishma Kukreti 30/11/2013 for review and interpretation
                  References
1-Bhishma Kukreti, 1984, Garhwal Ki Lok Kathayen, Binsar Prakashan, Lodhi Colony, Delhi 110003
2- Bhishma Kukreti 2003, Salan Biten Garhwali Lok Kathayen, Rant Raibar, Dehradun
Xx
    Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal; Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Gangasalan Garhwal; Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Pauri Garhwal; Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Tehri Garhwal; Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Uttarkashi Garhwal; Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Dehradun Garhwal; Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Haridwar Garhwal; Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Rudraprayag Garhwal; Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Chamoli Garhwal; Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal, North India; Garhwali Folktales, Garhwali Fables, Traditional stories for Managers, executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal, South Asia;

Bhishma Kukreti

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Re: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi
« Reply #92 on: November 30, 2013, 05:17:09 PM »
Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale 

(A Research Review on Garhwali-Kumaoni –Haridwar Folk Literature)
                                (Folktales for Managers Series)
                          Management Lessons in Garhwali-Kumaoni Folktales -7
                Management Lessons in Garhwali –Kumaoni Folk Literature part -9

                     Research and Review by: Bhishma Kukreti

                 The Garhwal life was very hard and every time people needed help or strategy for survival. The people believed that simple solution or simple design or simple strategy is the best solution in management and management process.
                   The following Garhwali story speaks about avoiding complex solution and adores simple workable solution
                            A Garhwali Folk Story - Ganv ka Sayana: The Village Chief 


      The story is about long back years. There was a village Latu Ganv.
                 Husyaru had six she buffalos. One she buffalo had a kid. One day, the buffalo kid was thirsty and she entered into her master house in search of water. She entered her mouth and head into a ‘Parya’ (a wooden vessel for churning curd). Her head was inside the ‘Parya’ and the buffalo kid was unable to take out her mouth from Parya. Buffalo kid was restless and started throwing her neck here and there to get out from ‘Parya’ but was just unsuccessful to do so. Buffalo kid started running here and there. Husyaru saw the situation that the head of buffalo kid was inside the ‘Parya’. He asked help from other villagers but nobody could get out the head of buffalo kid from “Parya’.
 The villagers advised Husyaru to take help of village chief who was the wisest among all.
          The village chief was called to solve the problem. The village chief came and inspected the situation thoroughly and seriously. He walked around buffalo kid. The village chief ordered to cut the head of buffalo. The head of buffalo kid cut by sword and detached head from body. However, the problem of head being inside ‘Parya’ still existed.
              Now, the village chief ordered to cut the ‘Parya’. Immediately, a person cut wooden ‘Parya by an axe. The head of buffalo kid came out of ‘Parya’. Every villager cheered that the head of buffalo kid had come out. Every villager was astounded for the wise advice of village chief that at last head of buffalo kid came out.
 The villagers started singing and dancing for successful work due to advice by the village chief.

                 Benefits of Simple design for Product or Strategy
Simple design in product, service or strategy always is beneficial.
Simple design or solution in product, service or strategy is always appreciated by consumers.
Simple design increase productivity in production places.
Simple design in product, service or strategy decreases quality failures
Simple design for product, service or strategy is cheaper than complex design.
Simple design in product, service or strategy increases durability and affordability.
Simple design in product, service or strategy brings least conflicts among stakeholders,
The designer, service provider or strategy maker should understand the basic characteristics of design, service or strategy.
The designer, service provider or strategy maker should understand elements of design, service and strategy.
The designer, service provider or strategy maker should understand the factors that affect design, service or strategy process.
The designer, service provider or strategy maker should know problems, side effects, constrains in the process.

Copyright @ Bhishma Kukreti bckukreti@gmail.com  30/11/2013

     Notes on   Management Lessons in Garhwali –Kumaoni –Haridwar Folk Literature to be continued….
Management Lessons in Garhwali-Kumaon Folktales, Folk Stories, traditional Narratives, Community stories to be continued …
Research Review of Garhwali-Kumaoni Literature to be continued….
                  References
1-Bhishma Kukreti, 1984, Garhwal Ki Lok Kathayen, Binsar Prakashan, Lodhi Colony, Delhi 110003
2-Anil Dabral, 2007, Garhwali Gadya Parampara,
3- Bhishma Kukreti, 2003, Salan Biten Lok Kathayen, Rant Raibar, Dehradun
4- Bhishma Kukreti, October 2007, Gadhwali Lok kathaon ma Prabandh Shastra ki suchna, Chitthi Patrika (Lok Ktha Visheshank), Dehradun
Xx
Review of Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Uttarkashi, Garhwal; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Tehri Garhwal; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Chamoli Garhwal; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Rudraprayag Garhwal; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Pauri Garhwal; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Gangasalan Garhwal; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Dehradun Garhwal; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Haridwar Garhwal; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, Uttarakhand; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, North India; Simple Solution is the Best Management Style: A Management Lesson from Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, South Asia;                 

Bhishma Kukreti

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Re: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi
« Reply #93 on: December 01, 2013, 09:09:52 AM »
Pani Suki Gyayi -Water Dried Away: a Garhwali Folktale for Managers and Management Lesson

    Garhwali Folktales, Fables, Traditional stories for Managers,/executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal part- 8   

                        Folk Tales Collected and edited by: Bhishma Kukreti

              Long back in Jaspur of Malla Dhangu, Pauri Garhwal, d the water source was in the main village. The Jaspur inhabitants were happy. The people used to fetch water for their needs. The people used to irrigate filed and people of Jaspur used to produce onions and garlic from the nearby village fields. There was no need to take animals far for their thirst.   
  However, one day, the water dried away from the main village. The water source appeared itself one kilometer down of the village in west direction. Now, the villagers have to go another water source for water half the kilometer away in east direction.
 The reason was simple, a women having menstruation days. The terrible woman washed her menstruated clothes into water source. The water god cursed and water despaired. Now, that water source is down in west one kilometer away from Jaspur. 
We should never wash menstruated clothes into water source.

** This story is commonly remembered in village Jaspur whenever the water scarcity and water source is discussed.
Copyright @ Bhishma Kukreti 1/12/2013 for review and interpretation
                  References
1-Bhishma Kukreti, 1984, Garhwal Ki Lok Kathayen, Binsar Prakashan, Lodhi Colony, Delhi 110003
2- Bhishma Kukreti 2003, Salan Biten Garhwali Lok Kathayen, Rant Raibar, Dehradun
Xx
South Asian, Garhwali Folktale for Managers and Management Lesson; South Asian, Garhwali Folktale from Rudraprayag Garhwal for Managers and Management Lesson; South Asian, Garhwali Folktale from Chamoli Garhwal for Managers and Management Lesson; South Asian, Garhwali Folktale from Uttarkashi Garhwal for Managers and Management Lesson; South Asian, Garhwali Folktale from Tehri Garhwal for Managers and Management Lesson; South Asian, Garhwali Folktale from Pauri Garhwal for Managers and Management Lesson; South Asian, Garhwali Folktale from Dehradun Garhwal for Managers and Management Lesson; South Asian, Garhwali Folktale from Haridwar Garhwal for Managers and Management Lesson; South Asian, Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, Central Himalaya for Managers and Management Lesson; South Asian, Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, North India for Managers and Management Lesson;

Bhishma Kukreti

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Re: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi
« Reply #94 on: December 01, 2013, 01:34:00 PM »
               Importance of Ecosystem Management Lesson in Garhwali Folktale

(A Research Review on Garhwali-Kumaoni –Haridwar Folk Literature)
                                (Folktales for Managers Series)
                          Management Lessons in Garhwali-Kumaoni Folktales -8
                Management Lessons in Garhwali –Kumaoni Folk Literature part -10

                     Research and Review by: Bhishma Kukreti

                In Garhwal, there were many sayings and precautions to save water and environment as never cut trees above water source, never do excrete human wastes into any form of water.
              The following folktale from Gangasalan Garhwal is very important tales for teaching new generation to pay attention of workplace hygiene and keeping clean ecosystem in locality.
 The folktale is as under -
                        Pani Suki Gyayi -Water Dried Away: A Garhwali Folktale
              Long back in Jaspur of Malla Dhangu, Pauri Garhwal, d the water source was in the main village. The Jaspur inhabitants were happy. The people used to fetch water for their needs. The people used to irrigate filed and people of Jaspur used to produce onions and garlic from the nearby village fields. There was no need to take animals far for their thirst.   
  However, one day, the water dried away from the main village. The water source appeared itself one kilometer down of the village in west direction. Now, the villagers have to go another water source for water half the kilometer away in east direction.
 The reason was simple, a women having menstruation days. The terrible woman washed her menstruated clothes into water source. The water god cursed and water despaired. Now, that water source is down in west one kilometer away from Jaspur. 
We should never wash menstruated clothes into water source.

** This story is commonly remembered in village Jaspur whenever the water scarcity and water source is discussed.

                            Defining Ecosystem Management
   The ecosystem management is a process that conserves major ecological services, natural resources and at the same time caters the social economical and other needs of the region.
FEMT (1993) defines ecosystem management that s plan or strategy to manage ecosystem to provide all associated organisms, as opposed to a strategy or plan for managing individual species. 
Overbay (1992) defines ecosystem management that careful and skillful of ecological, economic, social and managerial principles in managing ecosystem to produce , restore or sustain ecosystem, integrity and desired conditions, uses, products,  values, and service over the long term.
 EPA (1994) defines ecosystem management that to restore and maintain the health sustainability and biological diversity of ecosystems while supporting sustainable economics and commerce.

              Benefits of Ecosystem Management
           Due to the protection of environment measures taken by society there is less loss of human beings and natural resources at the time o climate changes.
Ecosystem management enhances resilience and reduces vulnerability of food scarcity.
By effective ecosystem management the people get secured food supply.
By effective ecosystem management the society gets social well being facilities.
The effective ecosystem management reduces social disruption.
The effective ecosystem management reduces human pressure on ecosystem, hence reduces poverty.

          Seven Pillars of Ecosystem Management

   Famous environment expert Robert Lackey (1998) writes that there are seven pillars of effective ecosystem management –
1-The ecosystem management reflects continuous evolution of social values and priorities.
2- Ecosystem management is placed based
3- Ecosystem management should maintain ecosystem in the appropriate conditions for achieving the set goal.
4- Ecosystem management should take the ability of ecosystem to respond to variety of manmade or natural stresses.
5-Ecosystem management may or may not result in emphasis on biological diversity
6- The term ‘sustainability’ should be defined clearly.
7- Scientific information is important for effective ecosystem management.
 Above small write up about ecosystem management is proof that Garhwali folktales and literature is conscious of ecosystem management understand the procedure of ecosystem management. 


Copyright @ Bhishma Kukreti bckukreti@gmail.com  1/12/2013

     Notes on   Management Lessons in Garhwali –Kumaoni –Haridwar Folk Literature to be continued….
Management Lessons in Garhwali-Kumaon Folktales, Folk Stories, traditional Narratives, Community stories to be continued …
Research Review of Garhwali-Kumaoni Literature to be continued….
                  References
1-Bhishma Kukreti, 1984, Garhwal Ki Lok Kathayen, Binsar Prakashan, Lodhi Colony, Delhi 110003
2-Anil Dabral, 2007, Garhwali Gadya Parampara,
3- Bhishma Kukreti, 2003, Salan Biten Lok Kathayen, Rant Raibar, Dehradun
4- Bhishma Kukreti, October 2007, Gadhwali Lok kathaon ma Prabandh Shastra ki suchna, Chitthi Patrika (Lok Ktha Visheshank), Dehradun


Xx
Notes on Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Pauri Garhwal; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Malla Dhangu, Gangasalan Garhwal; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Uttarkashi Garhwal; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Tehri Garhwal; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Dehradun Garhwal; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Haridwar Garhwal; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Rudraprayag Garhwal; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Chamoli Garhwal; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, Uttarakhand ;  Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, Central Himalaya; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, North India; Importance of Ecosystem Management lesson in Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, South Asia;       

Bhishma Kukreti

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Re: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi
« Reply #95 on: December 02, 2013, 12:05:51 PM »
Barat Byoli Bagair Vapas kilai Ayi? Why did Marriage Party come back without Bride?

    Garhwali Folktales, Fables, Traditional stories for Managers,/executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal part- 9   

                        Folk Tales Collected and edited by: Bhishma Kukreti


               This is a community story of Kukreti family of Jaspur, Malla Dhangu, Pauri Garhwal.
                      Gudud Ji was younger brother and Mani ram Ji was elder brother. Mani ram ji died in his earlier age and Mani Ram Ji took care to our forefather family. By blood Mani ram Ji our forefather but we are called Gudud Ji kaunk or decedents of Gudud Ji because he fostered our forefather’s family. Mani ram Ji was also a future teller.
             One day, Gudud Ji and Mani ram Ji were ion a hill Plato for grazing cattle.  From a short distance a marriage process of a groom passed away. The marriage party was going to bride village for groom. The drum players were playing drum with entertaining tunes and so was bagpiper player playing bagpiper. The marriage party guests were happy.
               Mani Ram Ji took a stem of Kunaj (an aromatic herb) and broke it. Mani ram Ji watched inside the stem and Mani ram Ji told his younger brother that the groom would come back without bride.
              Second day, around before noon, both the brothers were on the same place. They saw that same marriage party was coming back without bride and without playing musical instruments.
              Gudud Ji asked the guests for their not bringing bride. The guests of marriage party informed Gudud Ji that bride was pregnant before marriage.
  Gudud Ji asked his elder brother Mani Ram Ji,” Elder Brother! How did you come to know that marriage party would come without bride?”
         Mani ram Ji replied,” The future teller should have solid base to tell the future. The Future teller should not tell the future without solid base. I saw an insect inside Kunaj ku Kathuk l or I saw an insect inside the stem of Kunuj. Kunuj is aromatic herb and very rarely insect is seen inside Kunuj stem. By that incident I guessed that the bride would be pregnant and groom marriage party would come back without bride.”
 We should take care in telling future that there should be solid base for guessing the future.


 ** Late Mrs Kwanra Devi w/o of late Shri Shish Ram Kukreti of Jaspur, Pauri Garhwal narrated this story to the writer.
Copyright @ Bhishma Kukreti 2/12/2013 for review and interpretation
Garhwali Folktales, Fables, Traditional stories for Managers,/executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal to be continued…
                  References
1-Bhishma Kukreti, 1984, Garhwal Ki Lok Kathayen, Binsar Prakashan, Lodhi Colony, Delhi 110003
2- Bhishma Kukreti 2003, Salan Biten Garhwali Lok Kathayen, Rant Raibar, Dehradun
Xx
A series on Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for administrative Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Marketing Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Sales Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Distribution Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Social media operation Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Internet marketing Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for HRD Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Production Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Personnel Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Purchase Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Material Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Manufacturing Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Political Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Forecasting Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for research and development Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for logistic  Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for planning Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for strategy formulation Managers;

Bhishma Kukreti

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Re: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi
« Reply #96 on: December 02, 2013, 05:08:28 PM »
                 Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale

         (A Research Review on Garhwali-Kumaoni –Haridwar Folk Literature)
                                (Folktales for Managers Series)
                          Management Lessons in Garhwali-Kumaoni Folktales -9

                Management Lessons in Garhwali –Kumaoni Folk Literature part -11

                     Research and Review by: Bhishma Kukreti

                  Forecasting is one of the vital aspects of management.
                  Forecasting is one of the planning tools for managers and in management that helps to chalk out to cope with uncertainty of the future, relying upon data from the past experience and present trends. 
            Forecasting starts from certain hypothesis based on the organization’s experience, knowledge, information and judgment.
  Forecasting is important for planning and decision making.
Forecasting methods are used in marketing, sales, manufacturing, purchase, inventory control, and in politics too.
  In management science till date, there are two main methods of forecasting –

                                 Subjective or Qualitative Approach of Forecasting
 Usually, in this method, the opinions of people are considered for forecasting.
Executive committee consensus – The knowledgeable executives are asked their opinions and a consensus is built. There is problem that powerful member or groups may influence the forecasting.
Delphi Method-In this method the experts are involved and eventually a consensus is developed. Usually, they make long term forecasting.
Sales force pr cadre force composite-The sales ore or cadre in politics are having ground reality knowledge and they involved in forecasting.
Consumer survey- By getting information from consumer survey the forecasting is done.


                       Objective or quantitative Approach of forecasting

 
                 Statistical formulations are used in quantitative forecasting method.
Time series Method-The independent variable is the time used to examine 1-Trends 2-Seasonal or 3-Factors that influence the demand data.
Casual Model-Barring time, other factors are used in forecasting

  Garhwali Folk literature is having instruction for better judgment on forecasting. For example, the following folktale from Gangasalan provides instruction that you should have certain data/certain solid base or certain important factor for forecasting.

       Barat Byoli Bagair Vapas kilai Ayi? Why did Marriage Party come back without Bride?

               This is a community story of Kukreti family of Jaspur, Malla Dhangu, Pauri Garhwal.
                      Gudud Ji was younger brother and Mani ram Ji was elder brother. Mani ram ji died in his earlier age and Mani Ram Ji took care to our forefather family. By blood Mani ram Ji our forefather but we are called Gudud Ji kaunk or decedents of Gudud Ji because he fostered our forefather’s family. Mani ram Ji was also a future teller.
             One day, Gudud Ji and Mani ram Ji were ion a hill Plato for grazing cattle.  From a short distance a marriage process of a groom passed away. The marriage party was going to bride village for groom. The drum players were playing drum with entertaining tunes and so was bagpiper player playing bagpiper. The marriage party guests were happy.
               Mani Ram Ji took a stem of Kunaj (an aromatic herb) and broke it. Mani ram Ji watched inside the stem and Mani ram Ji told his younger brother that the groom would come back without bride.
              Second day, around before noon, both the brothers were on the same place. They saw that same marriage party was coming back without bride and without playing musical instruments.
              Gudud Ji asked the guests for their not bringing bride. The guests of marriage party informed Gudud Ji that bride was pregnant before marriage.
  Gudud Ji asked his elder brother Mani Ram Ji,” Elder Brother! How did you come to know that marriage party would come without bride?”
         Mani ram Ji replied,” The future teller should have solid base to tell the future. The Future teller should not tell the future without solid base. I saw an insect inside Kunaj ku Kathuk l or I saw an insect inside the stem of Kunuj. Kunuj is aromatic herb and very rarely insect is seen inside Kunuj stem. By that incident I guessed that the bride would be pregnant and groom marriage party would come back without bride.”
 We should take care in telling future that there should be solid base for guessing the future.
 ** Late Mrs Kwanra Devi w/o of late Shri Shish Ram Kukreti of Jaspur, Pauri Garhwal narrated this story to the writer.



Copyright @ Bhishma Kukreti bckukreti@gmail.com  2/12/2013

     Notes on   Management Lessons in Garhwali –Kumaoni –Haridwar Folk Literature to be continued….
Management Lessons in Garhwali-Kumaon Folktales, Folk Stories, traditional Narratives, Community stories to be continued …
Research Review of Garhwali-Kumaoni Literature to be continued….
                  References
1-Bhishma Kukreti, 1984, Garhwal Ki Lok Kathayen, Binsar Prakashan, Lodhi Colony, Delhi 110003
2-Anil Dabral, 2007, Garhwali Gadya Parampara,
3- Bhishma Kukreti, 2003, Salan Biten Lok Kathayen, Rant Raibar, Dehradun
4- Bhishma Kukreti, October 2007, Gadhwali Lok kathaon ma Prabandh Shastra ki suchna, Chitthi Patrika (Lok Ktha Visheshank), Dehradun
Xx
  Notes on Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Malla Dhangu, Garhwal; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Ganga Salan Garhwal; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Pauri Garhwal; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Chamoli Garhwal; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Rudraprayag Garhwal; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Tehri Garhwal; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Uttarkashi Garhwal; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Dehradun Garhwal; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Haridwar Garhwal; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, Central Himalaya; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal, North India; Forecasting Factors for Manager and Management in Garhwali Folktale from Garhwal South Asia

Bhishma Kukreti

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Re: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi
« Reply #97 on: December 03, 2013, 04:30:54 PM »
         Bhima and Demon: A Garhwali Folktale for Manager

    Garhwali Folktales, Fables, Traditional stories for Managers,/executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal part- 10   

                        Folk Tales Collected and edited by: Bhishma Kukreti

               In Garhwal, the stories of Pandavas of Mahabharata are famous. There are tens of Mahabharata epic stories those took shape of folktales. Following Garhwali traditional story is related to Mahabharata epic.
                   When Pandavas (five brothers and their mother Kunti ) were sent to forest for thirteen years they came to valley of Bhilainagar and Bhagirathi Rivers.
             Roaming from one village to another village, Pandavas came to a village and found that people of village were in terrible conditions. The people were as good as dead. They did not have any enthusiasm in life.  Nobody was replying any question from Pandavas. Everybody suggested them to go away from the village.
              Pandavas watched that all members of a family are crying very loudly. Kunti asked the reason for their heavy crying to the woman of the said family.
           The old women replied that a few months back, a demon captured the village and started killing them for his meal.  The villagers requested the demon that instead of killing all people in a lot he should eat them one by one. Now, every evening, the villagers send one young boy to demon.  The boy had to enter a Chhan (cow shed) away from village. The old woman informed that today, the turn is for her son going to demon for never returning.
            Pandavas discussed the matter themselves. Kunti told to woman that today, her son Bhima would go to demon.
         The woman did not agree for sending Bhima the son of Kunti in place of her son to demon. Kunti assured the woman that Demon could not kill her brave son Bhima at any time. After much persuasion the village woman became ready to send Bhima in place of her son as meal for Demon.
         Bhima asked villagers to carry high vessels with water, a big vessel with curd and ten Supas (chaffing instrument or shaker) to the hut or Chhan. The villagers kept huge vessels full of water, a curd vessel and ten Supas.     
          Now, villagers came to village from hut. Bhima was alone in hut waiting for Demon. As soon as dark spread after some time of evening, Demon came to hut. He called, “Hey! Human come out of hut. Now, it is time for my meal. “
 Bhima laughed loudly in the hut. The laugh of Bhima was as cloud busting. Demon called Bhima to come out of hut as he was hungry. Bhima replied,” let me cut my nails.” After some time, Bhima threw ten Supas (chaffing instrument) out. The demon was shocked to see such big nails of human beings.
            The demon again called Bhima to come out of hut. Bhima replied,” Let me cough first.” After some time Bhima threw curd out of hut. Now, Demon started feeling fear. The demon was afraid that whose cough is so much the man must be heavy and powerful
          The demon called Bhima in low voice to come out of hut. Bhima replied,” let me first urinate.” Now Bhima started throwing water out from the hut. It took hours for Bhima to throw water from big vessels.
              The Demon became afraid that the man who had such big nails, who coughs so much cough, who urinates so much big quantity that man must be stronger than him.  Due to fear, Demon started running from the hut. Bhima came out and killed the Demon easily who was under fear.
            Bhima was wise person who made the demon fearful before the Demon could see Bhima.


** This story is told commonly in Jaspur, Malla Dhangu, Pauri Garhwal, India
Copyright @ Bhishma Kukreti 3/12/2013 for review and interpretation
Garhwali Folktales, Fables, Traditional stories for Managers,/executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal to be continued…
                  References
1-Bhishma Kukreti, 1984, Garhwal Ki Lok Kathayen, Binsar Prakashan, Lodhi Colony, Delhi 110003
2- Bhishma Kukreti 2003, Salan Biten Garhwali Lok Kathayen, Rant Raibar, Dehradun
Xx
A series on Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for administrative Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Marketing Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Sales Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Distribution Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Social media operation Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Internet marketing Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for HRD Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Production Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Personnel Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Purchase Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Material Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Manufacturing Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Political Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for Forecasting Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for research and development Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for logistic  Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for planning Managers; Motivating Folktales from Garhwal for strategy formulation Managers;

Bhishma Kukreti

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Re: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi
« Reply #98 on: December 03, 2013, 07:40:42 PM »
               Perception or Propaganda as Marketing Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale

         (A Research Review on Garhwali, Kumaoni, Haridwar Folk Literature)
                                (Folktales for Managers Series)
                          Management Lessons in Garhwali-Kumaoni Folktales -10

                Management Lessons in Garhwali –Kumaoni Folk Literature part -12

                     Research and Review by: Bhishma Kukreti

                  Propaganda is defined a message designed to persuade its intended audience or customers to think in a specific in certain or specific manner.
 The propaganda is a form of communication to influence audience in a specific manner for religious concept, war results, social results.
  Propaganda is a way of communication that communication promotes a specific idea or concept or thinking. The propaganda may be true or false and truth together.
                Propaganda is one of the oldest tools for winning the battle or war before real fight. There are many instances in Mahabharata about perceptional or propaganda communication before real battle.
             Even today, marketing manager or sales manager follows propaganda communication before launching a product, service or an advertisement campaign.
 Many press notes about company or company promoters before IPO, FPO, Units, bonds etc is a kind of propaganda marketing strategy.
              Before release ofa film, press conferences or promotional actions by actors or actresses or rumor spread about illicit relation of male and female artists of a film is nothing but propaganda marketing communication.
              Releasing a couple of sensitive issues in a book through press notes or rumors before release of book is propaganda for promoting a book.
            The recent publicity used by Am Admi Parti before entering in Delhi election is definitely propaganda marketing warfare.
  Spreading harmful rumors about opponent brands or politicians is also propaganda marketing strategy.

  The following techniques are used in propaganda marketing –
Ad Hominem; Ad nauseam; Appeal to Authority; Appeal to fear; Appeal to Prejudice; Bandwagon; Inevitable Victory; Join the Crow; Beautiful people; The Lie; Black and White fallacy; Classical conditioning; Cognitive dissonance; Common man;  Cult of personality; Demonizing the enemy; Dictat; Disinformation; Euphoria; Fear, uncertainty; doubt; Flag waving’; Foot –in-the door; glittering the generalities; Half truth; Labeling; Latitudes of acceptances; Love bombing; Lying and Deception; Managing the news; Milieu Control; Name Calling; Confusion; Obtain disapproval; Operant conditioning;  oversimplification; Pensee unique ; Quotes out of context; Making excuses; Red herring; Repetition; Scapegoating;   Slogans; Stereotyping; Third Party technique; Thought terminating cliché; transfer; Selective truth; Unusual assumption; Virtue words.


 The following Garhwali folktale is the best example of Propaganda marketing management –

         Bhima and Demon: A Garhwali Folktale for Manager


               In Garhwal, the stories of Pandavas of Mahabharata are famous. There are tens of Mahabharata epic stories those took shape of folktales. Following Garhwali traditional story is related to Mahabharata epic.
                   When Pandavas (five brothers and their mother Kunti ) were sent to forest for thirteen years they came to valley of Bhilainagar and Bhagirathi Rivers.
             Roaming from one village to another village, Pandavas came to a village and found that people of village were in terrible conditions. The people were as good as dead. They did not have any enthusiasm in life.  Nobody was replying any question from Pandavas. Everybody suggested them to go away from the village.
              Pandavas watched that all members of a family are crying very loudly. Kunti asked the reason for their heavy crying to the woman of the said family.
           The old women replied that a few months back, a demon captured the village and started killing them for his meal.  The villagers requested the demon that instead of killing all people in a lot he should eat them one by one. Now, every evening, the villagers send one young boy to demon.  The boy had to enter a Chhan (cow shed) away from village. The old woman informed that today, the turn is for her son going to demon for never returning.
            Pandavas discussed the matter themselves. Kunti told to woman that today, her son Bhima would go to demon.
         The woman did not agree for sending Bhima the son of Kunti in place of her son to demon. Kunti assured the woman that Demon could not kill her brave son Bhima at any time. After much persuasion the village woman became ready to send Bhima in place of her son as meal for Demon.
         Bhima asked villagers to carry high vessels with water, a big vessel with curd and ten Supas (chaffing instrument or shaker) to the hut or Chhan. The villagers kept huge vessels full of water, a curd vessel and ten Supas.     
          Now, villagers came to village from hut. Bhima was alone in hut waiting for Demon. As soon as dark spread after some time of evening, Demon came to hut. He called, “Hey! Human come out of hut. Now, it is time for my meal. “
 Bhima laughed loudly in the hut. The laugh of Bhima was as cloud busting. Demon called Bhima to come out of hut as he was hungry. Bhima replied,” let me cut my nails.” After some time, Bhima threw ten Supas (chaffing instrument) out. The demon was shocked to see such big nails of human beings.
            The demon again called Bhima to come out of hut. Bhima replied,” Let me cough first.” After some time Bhima threw curd out of hut. Now, Demon started feeling fear. The demon was afraid that whose cough is so much the man must be heavy and powerful
          The demon called Bhima in low voice to come out of hut. Bhima replied,” let me first urinate.” Now Bhima started throwing water out from the hut. It took hours for Bhima to throw water from big vessels.
              The Demon became afraid that the man who had such big nails, who coughs so much cough, who urinates so much big quantity that man must be stronger than him.  Due to fear, Demon started running from the hut. Bhima came out and killed the Demon easily who was under fear.
            Bhima was wise person who made the demon fearful before the Demon could see Bhima.


** This story is told commonly in Jaspur, Malla Dhangu, Pauri Garhwal, India



 

Copyright @ Bhishma Kukreti bckukreti@gmail.com  3/12/2013

     Notes on   Management Lessons in Garhwali –Kumaoni –Haridwar Folk Literature to be continued….
Management Lessons in Garhwali-Kumaon Folktales, Folk Stories, traditional Narratives, Community stories to be continued …
Research Review of Garhwali-Kumaoni Literature to be continued….
                  References
1-Bhishma Kukreti, 1984, Garhwal Ki Lok Kathayen, Binsar Prakashan, Lodhi Colony, Delhi 110003
2-Anil Dabral, 2007, Garhwali Gadya Parampara,
3- Bhishma Kukreti, 2003, Salan Biten Lok Kathayen, Rant Raibar, Dehradun
4- Bhishma Kukreti, October 2007, Gadhwali Lok kathaon ma Prabandh Shastra ki suchna, Chitthi Patrika (Lok Ktha Visheshank), Dehradun
Xx
Notes on Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Garhwal; Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Malla Salan, Garhwal;  Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Lansdowne Tahsil ,Garhwal; Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Pauri Garhwal; Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Chamoli Garhwal; Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Rudraprayag Garhwal; Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Tehri Garhwal;  Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Uttarkashi Garhwal; Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Dehradun Garhwal; Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Hardwar Garhwal; Perception or Propaganda as a Management Tool in Garhwali Folktale, discernment management in Garhwali Folk stories, opinion making communication in Garhwali community narratives from Garhwal, North India; 

Bhishma Kukreti

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Re: Let Us be Effective Manager (Mangament Guru)-By Bi
« Reply #99 on: December 04, 2013, 04:19:26 PM »
Pigeon Pea Plant (Gahath Ki Dali): A Garhwali Folktale for Managers


Garhwali Folktales, Fables, Traditional stories for Managers,/executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal part- 11   

                         Translation by: Bhishma Kukreti

                   There was farmer in a village. He had second wife because his first wife died early. The famer had a five year old boy from his first wife. His present wife used to envy by that boy. His second wife gave ultimatum to her husband that if he do not burry his son into plough line in the field (gap or small canal happens due to plough) she would not live with him. As happened always, he was weak before his second wife. He agreed to bury his son in the field while plough.
      One day, the farmer was plough in an upper contour filed and his son was playing on lower field. The son saw pigeon pea plants. He started fencing those pigeon pea plants.  The famer took plough to through on his son for killing the son. The farmer was ready to throw plough on his son. At the same time, his son called him,” Father! These pigeon pea plants are already grown up there. Don’t uproot them.  These are already grown plants and we don’t know whether new plants would come or not from sowing the pigeon pea seeds.”
 The farmer got shock by precious words from his five year old boy.
He came home and told in straight words to his wife, “Listen cruel woman!  I shall not obey you.  I will not kill my already grown boy. Nobody knows you would give birth to child or not. For unseen future, I would never spoil my assured present.”

 **This folk story for Manager is taken from Garhwali Gadya Parampara by Dr Anil Dabral, page 165

Copyright @ Bhishma Kukreti 3/12/2013 for review and interpretation
Garhwali Folktales, Fables, Traditional stories for Managers,/executives, boss, supervisors or Stories for management from Garhwal to be continued…
                  References
1-Bhishma Kukreti, 1984, Garhwal Ki Lok Kathayen, Binsar Prakashan, Lodhi Colony, Delhi 110003
2- Bhishma Kukreti 2003, Salan Biten Garhwali Lok Kathayen, Rant Raibar, Dehradun
Xx
 Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Gangasalan ,Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Malla Dhangu Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Pauri Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Chamoli Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Rudraprayag Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Uttarkashi Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Dehradun Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Hardwar Garhwal for Managers; Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Garhwal Uttarakhand for Managers; Motivating Asian Folk tales, Inspiring South Asian folk stories, Encouraging Asian traditional narratives, South Asian Inducing community fictions from Garhwal , North India for Managers;

 

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