Author Topic: Share Informative Articles Here - सूचनाप्रद लेख  (Read 66733 times)

suchira

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Re: SHARE ANY INFORMATIVE ARTICLE WITH MEMBERS HERE.
« Reply #50 on: November 30, 2007, 11:58:53 AM »
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suchira

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Re: SHARE ANY INFORMATIVE ARTICLE WITH MEMBERS HERE.
« Reply #51 on: November 30, 2007, 11:59:49 AM »
Friends,

We do copy various data by ctrl+c for pasting elsewhere. This copied
data is stored in clipboard and is accessible from the net by a
combination of Javascripts and ASP.

Just try this:
1) Copy any text by ctrl+c
2) Click the Link:
http://www.sourcecodesworld.com/special/clipboard.asp
3) You will see the text you copied on the Screen which was
accessed by this web page.

Do not keep sensitive data (like passwords, creditcard numbers, PIN
etc.) in the clipboard while surfing the web. It is extremely easy to
extract the text stored in the clipboard to steal your sensitive
information.

Forward this information to as many friends as you can, to save them
from online frauds !

suchira

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Re: SHARE ANY INFORMATIVE ARTICLE WITH MEMBERS HERE.
« Reply #52 on: November 30, 2007, 12:01:22 PM »
Can you imagine this happening in INDIA?

Government of India has an online Grievance forum at

http://darpg-grievance.nic.in

The government wants people to use this tool to highlight the problems they
faced while dealing with Government officials or departments like Passport
Office, Electricity board, BSNL/MTNL, Railways etc etc.
I know many people will say that these things don't work in India, but this
actually works as one of our friend  . The guy I'm talking about lives in
Faridabad. Couple of months back, the Faridabad Municipal Corporation laid
new roads in his area and the residents were very happy about it. But 2
weeks later, BSNL dugged up the newly laid roads to install new cables
which annoyed all the residents including this guy. But it was only this
guy who used the above listed grievance forum to highlight his concern. And
to his surprise, BSNL and Municipal Corporation of Faridabad was served a
show cause notice and the guy received a copy of the notice in one week.
Government has asked the MC and BSNL about the goof up as it's clear that
both the government departments were not in sync at all.
So use this grievance forum and educate others who don't know about this
facility. This way we can at least raise our concerns instead of just
talking about the 'System' in India.


suchira

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Re: SHARE ANY INFORMATIVE ARTICLE WITH MEMBERS HERE.
« Reply #53 on: November 30, 2007, 04:25:15 PM »
If suffering from back pain do some of these exercises

suchira

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Re: SHARE ANY INFORMATIVE ARTICLE WITH MEMBERS HERE.
« Reply #54 on: November 30, 2007, 04:26:16 PM »
few more...

suchira

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Re: SHARE ANY INFORMATIVE ARTICLE WITH MEMBERS HERE.
« Reply #55 on: November 30, 2007, 04:27:38 PM »
two more

एम.एस. मेहता /M S Mehta 9910532720

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Re: SHARE ANY INFORMATIVE ARTICLE WITH MEMBERS HERE.
« Reply #56 on: November 30, 2007, 04:29:31 PM »

Suchira Ji,

Good job. To give some health realted information to our members in addition to other discussion.

These are good animated clippings and same Ram Dev baba also say to people.


If suffering from back pain do some of these exercises

एम.एस. मेहता /M S Mehta 9910532720

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Re: SHARE ANY INFORMATIVE ARTICLE WITH MEMBERS HERE.
« Reply #57 on: December 01, 2007, 10:13:04 AM »
Water: A Lifeline for India's Villages
 
 

It gives me great pleasure to participate in this project launch workshop for the Punjab State Roads Project and Punjab Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Project. We at the World Bank are very happy to be supporting two such important initiatives to strengthen infrastructure in the state of Punjab. Speaking personally, I am delighted to be here among a people whose enterprise and energy are legendary in India.

 

When I first came to Delhi I was struck by the fact that on every holy day of the Sikhs, I would see little stalls set up on the streets where devout people would be distributing drinking water and other cool drinks to thirsty passersby. Seeing those people use water as a blessing to others brought home to me the centrality of water to our lives. We celebrate our religious days with it; our folk songs sing of its blessings; our ancient cities grew up around it; we and our lands would be dead without it.


Yet we have not always managed this precious resource wisely. Worldwide, more than a billion people don’t get safe drinking water. In India, despite having more water available per person than many other drier countries, water shortages are chronic. No Indian city supplies more than a few hours of water to its people; women in villages still spend hours everyday walking huge distances to fill a few pots for their family’s uses; and hundreds of children still fall prey to diseases like diarrhoea, cholera and hepatitis, all brought on by drinking unclean water.


Official statistics tell us that more than 90 percent of Indians have access to drinking water. But we know that access does not always translate into availability. The pipes and pumps might have been installed; but it does not mean that water actually flows out of the pipes for more than a couple of hours each day. Nor does it mean that the water that does come is safe or reliable, leaving infants and children especially vulnerable to water-borne diseases.


We also know that it is the poor who bear the brunt of water shortages. In villages, it is the usually the poor who must fetch water from faraway sources for their daily needs. And in cities, it is the poor who are at the end of the empty pipe and so need to buy water from private operators at many times the price paid by the better-off people who have service.


I was in Uttarakhand recently and there, in one of the mountain villages, I saw this young girl – she must have been barely 12 years old – with this huge metal pot of water on her head; she was trudging up to her home, halfway up the hillside. That is when I made a promise to myself to support any and all such endeavors that would ensure that that child did not have to ever carry a pot up that hill again.

 

Nor is the picture on sanitation any more encouraging. Less than 40 percent of households in Indian villages have access to proper toilets. And where they do have toilets, effluent from septic-tanks can be found flowing in open drains. This, as you know, not only poses a serious health hazard but has also degraded the environmental conditions in our villages.


I am glad the Government of Punjab has taken note of the pressing need for making drinking water and sanitation available to all its people in all its villages. I am told that one-third of villages here have yet to be connected to safe drinking water services and that half the rural households need proper and hygienic sanitation facilities. I am sure that this new program, which is being given the highest priority by the state government, will help improve the quality of life for people in Punjab’s villages.


But, as you well know Mr. Chief Minister, setting up enlightened programs is just the beginning and the greater challenge lies in effective implementation. We at the World Bank have found that putting people incharge of the factors that influence their lives is perhaps the best way of ensuring that the resources and services allocated actually reach their destination. This is why we have proposed the community-driven approach for the Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Program for your state. The Government of India has endorsed this approach for the entire country through the Swajaldhara program and the World Bank is currently assisting the states of Uttarakhand, Maharashtra, Kerala and Karnataka run similar schemes.

 

In all these states, we have found that the local villagers are best placed to implement these schemes. They best know what the local demand is; they know where the best water sources are to meet these demands; and they know their own capacities to pay so they can accordingly plan the levels of service they need. All they require is financial and technical training to set up the water supply schemes and manage and operate them.


It is heartening to know that the Punjab project will put in place the above principles through greater collaboration and partnership between the Punjab’s Water Supply and Sanitation Department and the rural communities and will help build the people’s capacities to effectively manage such a partnership.


I would also like to commend the Government of Punjab’s decision to implement the project across all the districts in the state. This will not only bring water and sanitation to some 74 lakh people, but will also allow the government to be consistent in its approach across the sector. The Government has also shown its commitment to the poor and vulnerable sections by choosing to particularly target people belonging to the Scheduled Castes, and those living in difficult terrain.


The cost of the total program is US$ 261 million, and the World Bank is happy to support the Government of Punjab with an interest-free grant of US$ 154 million. The remaining costs are shared by the Government of India and the Government of Punjab, with local gram panchayats contributing around US$ 15.7 million.


Access to transport is also as vital as access to water. Like India as a whole, Punjab is faced with developing a modern road network that has the quality and capacity to meet the needs of its growing economy. Goods from Punjab’s farms need to reach mandis and cities; the products manufactured in Punjab’s factories and industries need to reach ports and railheads. People need to reach hospitals, schools and colleges. Good quality roads make all this possible in less time and at reduced costs.

Punjab has, in its Five-Year Plan, identified better roads, lower transport costs and higher transport service standards as core elements of your growth agenda. We at the World Bank are happy to support your endeavor to improve the economic competitiveness of Punjab.


The Punjab State Roads Sector Project will help improve and maintain the quality of some 7,400 km of Plan Roads in the state. These roads include the state highways, major district roads and other district roads, and will provide the crucial link between the rural road network and the National Highways. I also expect that investing in these roads will help catalyze economic activity in villages and small towns.


We all know that economic diversification is critical to accelerating economic growth in Punjab. An effective road network will help encourage farmers to shift from their present heavy dependence on wheat and rice to higher value crops like vegetables, fruits and flowers – all of which are more vulnerable to delays in getting them from farms to markets. Good transport infrastructure will also help the development of light manufacturing and service industries that depend on precision and speed in logistics.

 

And it is not just the economic benefits that are significant. I remember a similar project being implemented a few years ago in my country, Morocco. It was a typical rural roads project that sought to link the interiors with market towns and cities; but as road sector projects went, it was not counted a very successful project in the World Bank because it had a low economic impact. But, when we evaluated the project we found that we had missed its greatest impact – all the girls in the project area were now attending school because the new roads had opened up faster and safer access to schools. Infrastructure development often brings in its wake a string of similar social benefits and I am sure the Punjab State Roads Project will prove no different.

 

The World Bank is delighted to support the government’s program to develop its state road network. The US$250 million equivalent loan from the Bank will supplement the Government of Punjab’s contribution of US $ 83.4 million.


On behalf of the World Bank, I take pleasure in extending our best wishes to the Government of Punjab, and to the people of Punjab for the successful completion of these projects. As the success stories start emerging, the Bank would be willing to provide additional support to Punjab if the state and Central government so desire.

 
 

एम.एस. मेहता /M S Mehta 9910532720

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State has abundant forest wealth
« Reply #58 on: December 01, 2007, 11:42:50 AM »
State has abundant forest wealth

By HT
Saturday December 1, 01:03 AM
Adequate compensation for preserving its abundant forest wealth is one demand that finds enough supporters in Uttarakhand. Recent valuation of its forest resource has given rise to hopes that the hill state could gain financially from it.

According to a report 'Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Forest Governance in Uttarakhand', forests in the state have been valued at nearly Rs 10,700 crores per year or $2.4 billion. A total of 32 services including climate management, soil conservation, carbon sequestration, climate management, timber, firewood, pollination and hydrological regulation were taken into account.

Noted ecologist and Vice Chancellor, HNB Garhwal University, Prof. S.P. Singh, was a key figure in preparing the report for Leadership for Environment and Development (LEAD) and Central Himalayan Environmental Association (CHEA).
It mentions that since the forests, which cover nearly 65 per cent of total area, value about $1,150 per hectare per year, people should be compensated for preserving forests at the cost of development.

suchira

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Re: SHARE ANY INFORMATIVE ARTICLE WITH MEMBERS HERE.
« Reply #59 on: December 04, 2007, 05:36:50 PM »
How to prepare for interview

Preparation for Interview
Research the Organization

Find out some basic information about the organization before you go for the interview. You will be in a better position to ask intelligent questions and you will impress the interviewer with your initiative and your knowledge of the organization. (For information on how to conduct research please ask for the Research handout at the Career Resource Center.)
Research the Job

Employers often list more qualifications in the job posting than can realistically be met by most potential candidates. Frequently, this is done as a pre-screening device in order to reduce the number of applicants for the position by setting up artificial barriers. You should not allow this to discourage you or prevent you from pursuing the position .

Just as you are looking for the ideal job, employers are looking for the ideal employee. Analyze the job description and match your experiences, skills, interests, and abilities to the job. You may find that some of the qualifications are less essential than others. Emphasize your strong points to minimize the effect of possible limited experience.

Talk with people who have worked in similar positions in that organization or in other companies. Read about the specific job category in the career literature. As a result of your research, you will have gained information about the nature of the job, the level of education and/or training necessary, future potential, and other pertinent details.
Prepare and Anticipate Question

Anticipate questions that may be asked of you in an interview. Prepare answers beforehand to some of the more difficult or sensitive questions. (See "Handling Difficult Questions".) This does not mean memorizing responses or writing a script. It does mean planning the points you want to make. Also, prepare questions you would like to ask the employer. For example, "How do you evaluate job performance?"
Practice Good Communication Skills

It is important that you use good communication skills during the interview. Practice with a friend, with a career counselor, or by videotaping a mock interview. Work on the following communication skills:

    * Presenting yourself in a positive and confident manner
    * Offering a firm handshake
    * Speaking clearly and effectively
    * Listening attentively and maintaining eye contact
    * Avoiding the use of unnecessary verbal and non-verbal distractions

Dress Appropriately

Dress professionally for the interview. Remember that you don't get a second chance to make a first impression. Your appearance should be neat and clean, pressed and polished. Conservative business attire is appropriate for most settings.
Be Punctual

Be on time for the interview. Plan to arrive about fifteen minutes early. Check in with the interviewer or the secretary about five to ten minutes prior to your scheduled appointment. Use your waiting time to check your appearance, review the questions and answers you prepared, and read any company literature that may be on display. Take advantage of this time to get a feel for the work environment by observing the surroundings and interactions among staff.

 

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